Haiku/Haiga

March 10, 2016  •  Leave a Comment

 

One single melting

stolen moment of mid-pause

new consequences.

Haiku/Haiga

This is a contemplative pause entertaining a pathway known to me but not yet intentionally or fully explored. It is a pathway that I believe may well connect to my ‘artist within’.  Or rather the essence of what I am to ‘be about’ in communicating via the photographic arts.

It is the rediscovering of haiku and haiga, early forms of Japanese poetry and art.  I am finding that they are re-energizing my search for the what and how I want to communicate whatever wisdom I can share.

As I look back over my way of speaking and photographing, I see there is a pattern in both that tends to use limited words and images. Haiku and haiga use similar brevity patterns. In haiku every word is significant and integral; in haiga every line, texture and shape is integral. In addition, and as in these ancient forms, I have also tried to include the five senses of hearing, tasting, touching, smelling, and seeing while keeping the essence of the subject authentic and simple to its basic form.

To test if there is a compatibility between these ancient Japanese art forms and my current way of seeing photographically, I chose several photographs and made a novice effort to write what I feel to be some form of haiku. In this effort, I found that at first blush the words came easily, perhaps too easily. Yes, they all had 17 syllables and using the common 5-7-5 formula. (I have come to find out that both of these ‘rules’ are not absolutely necessary.) Though haiku, especially when it first became a known form, was to be solely related to nature, my photographs and words were not based on nature. Again, not necessary in this modern day.

So what is the point?

I often speak about signature style and prompt other photographers to at least explore what that looks like for them. I do this knowing that their search may never reach a conclusion. Just read about other ‘master’ artists and become aware of all the ‘phases’ or styles through which they worked. The best way I know of determining if one is on track toward discovering a so-called signature style is by sensing a resonance with a perceived or experienced approach. This resonance, a tone or timbre within, feels like a very positive wake-up or aliveness that directly relates to something that has made itself present in one’s life. When I connected a few of my photographs with my own form of haiku poetry it did feel like a powerful resonance. The search for a signature style suddenly became connected to the what and how I want to communicate with the world at large rather than, what style of photography do I want to exhibit, sell and/or publish.

Perhaps the next step is to begin to de-clutter my photography files by reviewing their affinity with these ancient forms of haiku and haiga. This may be the best way to further test the ‘resonance’ I am feeling and the pathway it appears to announce.


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